Experience Exchange Sever

January 20, 2010

SMTP vs Memory

Filed under: Exchange 2003 — vijayarelangovan @ 10:34 pm

  • SMTP gateway servers use memory primarily for maintaining connections and keeping track of vital information about messages in the queues.
  • The memory used to store message properties on queued e-mail can be significant.
  • SMTP stores messages in the queue in two states:

1. opened (that it, it keeps a handle open) or

2. closed (that is, it closes the handle).

  • The maximum number of messages that an SMTP gateway queues before refusing new messages is 90,000.
  • SMTP can keep 1,000 messages in the queue open at any particular time, closing old messages as new ones arrive.
  • An open message in the queue consumes approximately 10 KB of memory in the Inetinfo process, and a closed message consumes approximately 4 KB of memory in the Inetinfo process.
  • The maximum number of messages that an SMTP gateway queues before refusing new messages is 90,000.
  • A simple calculation that explains this,

1,000 open messages = 10 MB of Inetinfo memory

1,000 open messages + 20,000 closed messages = 80 MB of Inetinfo memory

1,000 open messages + 89,000 closed messages = 366 MB of Inetinfo memory

Traffics:

  • Low-traffic SMTP gateway servers can perform adequately with 256 MB of RAM.
  • In high-traffic data centers, where large queues are common and large distribution lists are expanded, at least 512 MB of RAM is preferred.
  • Generally, an SMTP gateway server does not benefit by having more than 1 GB of memory.

Which means that at any given point of time, any Exchange server with basic configuration is capable of handling emails of any size.

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